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Issue One
Issue Zero – Opuscule
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10
Articles
Literature
All Motifs
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A breast is a breast is a breast
Alide Cagidemetrio
To contemplate Pompeii is to contemplate archeology in its most extreme form, framed by the wish not only for discovery, but for resurrection.
Essay
Beyond thalassophobia
Walter Grünzweig

German vice-chancellor Robert Habeck has more than twenty books to his name: fiction, drama, literary criticism, and non-fiction. It is tempting to read his fiction for glimpses of Green political futures, and his literary criticism for similar clues. How experimental can a literary politician be?

Essay
Eat the dust
Patricio Pron

Søren Kierkegaard compared reading reviews of his books to « the long martyrdom of being trampled to death by geese. » What martyrdoms does today’s bookishness portend?

Essay
To see a city
Alexander Wells

« What if all fictional characters from novels continue to dwell somewhere, just like the dead? » Daniela Hodrová’s City of Torment (Trýznivé město) is a magical-realist trilogy set in Prague. Her fragmented narratives, sewn together, make something deeply European.

Review
« When I was silent… »
— Interview with Sulaiman Addonia
Sander Pleij

Stop! I am doing what they all do: presenting writer Sulaiman Addonia as one-who-has-suffered, because he grew up as a refugee. The problem is, in part, a problem of genre. Suffering has become an interviewer’s crutch.

Interview
Why we write
Ali Smith

A letter to George Orwell. « All narrative is hypnotic. Some narratives are more hypnotic than others. Because of you, we can be conscious of the kinds and the workings of the narratives that set out to deaden us, lessen us, make us lie, make us part of the lie. »

Essay
Женщина—это и есть пространство
Caroline Tracey

Пространство—это ключевое слово в понимании литературной и философической истории России. Оксана Васякина переделывает русское пространство—и русский роман—для женских миров.

Woman is space
Caroline Tracey

« Space », or prostranstvo, is a key word for understanding the literary and philosophical history of Russia. Oksana Vasyakina's Rana (Wound), a Siberian road novel remakes the Russian landscape—and the Russian novel—for women's worlds. It renders prostranstvo unruly, polysemous, queer.

Review
Football is not football
Simon Kuper

How do literary movements arise? About thirty years ago, I watched one emerge out of nothing: the subgenre of “literary” football books and magazines. Not exactly the birth of modernism, but it still taught me something about how cultural transmission works within Europe.

Essay
A kayak in Zierikzee
George Blaustein

Was a Dutch town founded by Inuits in the 9th century? On American discoveries of Europe.

Essay
The ordinary jacket of today
The Editors

One reason we believe so much in the ERB is that it doesn’t stand in competition with magazines we love; it joins them, and does so in admiration. This project has, in fact, made us encounter literary magazines we hadn’t read before, look anew at magazines we’d put aside, discover beautiful magazines in languages we wish we could read. We’re starting the ERB because of the new solidarities such a magazine can create.

From the editors
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